paleolimnology

Stratigraphic diagrams with tidypaleo & ggplot2

This post covers creating stratigraphic diagrams using ggplot2, highlighting the helpers contained within the tidypaleo package, which I’ve been using for the past few months to create diagrams. I chose the ggplot2 framework because it is quite flexible and can be used to create almost any time-stratigraphic diagram except ones that involve multiple axes (we can have a fight about whether or not those are appropriate anyway, but if you absolutely need to create them I suggest you look elsewhere).

Using the tidyverse to wrangle core data

The paleolimnological data I work with most days is voluminous and difficult to wrangle. There are a lot of cores, a lot of variables, and a lot of parameters thanks to the multi-element analysis of the X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer we’ve used recently on our sediment samples. However, since the advent of the tidyverse, this job has gotten a lot easier! I’ve been preparing some material to help students at the Centre for Water Resources Studies at Dalhousie and the Paleoenvironmental Research Group at Acadia handle what are quickly becoming big data projects.

New article!

It’s been a nearly 9-month saga, but I’m pleased to announce that my first ever peer-reviewed paper has been published in the Journal of Paleolimnology as of October 2016. The paper (”A geochemical perspective on the impact of development at Alta Lake, British Columbia, Canada”) is a result of my M.Sc. work on Alta Lake in Whistler, British Columbia. Hopefully the first of many to come!